Saturday, November 6, 2010

"Calvin and the Colonel" color clips



MCA-Universal syndicated "Calvin and the Colonel" worldwide all the way up to mid-1980s. Despite being available for so long, however, not many stations ran it.

Most bootleg copies in circulation came from black and white network prints so even today it's hard to find color footage. However somebody recently started selling color copies, which you can buy from this site. I bought one of the discs, which is where the following clips came from.

Here are the opening and closing. In ABC these were only used in the first six episodes but MCA decided to slap them into all 26 of them for syndication. The names in the credits are more or less the same in every episode (in the 2nd closing fewer artists were credited) but this practice made it seem that Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher did all the scripts. While they wrote most of the episodes there were a handful written by others, including Bob Ross and T. Hee.





Here's an actual episode clip, from The Colonel's Old Flame (first broadcast February 17, 1962). It was adapted from an Amos & Andy radio script Kingfish's Old Flame, Boo Boo Winters.



And finally, an assortment of screenshots.





6 comments:

Chris Sobieniak said...

Not bad at all!

Anonymous said...

The Color On these Clips you Posted, Baker, Are Fantastic!, These Seem To Have Been Made From Beautiful Non Faded Prints, I Wonder What Color Stock They Were Printed. Asim

Brubaker said...

Eastman LPP most likely. I know LPP prints of "Calvin" are around (though VERY hard to find)

Anonymous said...

They Were Printed on Eastman Stock!?, Then How Come they Did Not Fade with Age, Like Technicolor Prints.

Asim

Brubaker said...

The LPP stock (introduced in the 1980s) is a lowfade stock. For more information, see the following website:

http://www.paulivester.com/films/filmstock/guide.htm

Anonymous said...

WOW!, Thanks for the Link, Brubaker, That is Really Fantastic!!!, I Sure Wish The Awesome LPP Safety Color Stock was Invented Much Earlier In the Late 1940a Instead of that Awful Red Eastmancolor Stock. The LPP color process should've Been Eastmancolor, and Had LPP been invented earlier, we would've stopped using Nitrate and the Higly Expensive Technicolor stock for Good!.

Asim.